April 19, 2014
Charlie from the Trillions’ stage presence is like… Marc Bolan as Archie comics character. Like if T. Rex guest-starred in an issue of Josie and the Pussycats or something.

Charlie from the Trillions’ stage presence is like… Marc Bolan as Archie comics character. Like if T. Rex guest-starred in an issue of Josie and the Pussycats or something.

April 19, 2014

isabelthespy:

probably my favorite scene was when natasha and steve are in the car. u kno what i mean. bros being bros! when are they gonna release a marvel movie that’s just 100% bro time, zero percent sad stuff. marvel universe: friends forever. would be here for that.

I think about this ALL THE TIME. I remember the New Avengers annual where it was basically just “OK, Luke and Jessica are getting married and everyone’s moving into Avengers Mansion, let’s just watch them all interact!” And I was like “WHY AREN’T ALL COMIC BOOKS LIKE THIS”

April 19, 2014
Things I’ve Written For Work Recently.

Jeez, it’s been three weeks since I did one of these rundowns. Sorry guys, I’ll try to make this quick.

Late Night Radio Interview/ticket giveaway (my part was 220 words): Wrote the introduction and the giveaway-hype paragraph at the end for this Q&A with a DJ that played here a few weeks ago. One of my coworkers was involved in helping promote the show so he did the Q&A itself, but he is, um, not a writer, so he needed my help to make this into a real article. Always fun trying to write an introductory paragraph about an artist I’d never heard of until I got the assignment 5 minutes before I started writing.

Brief writeup about new single by local indie group Lightfields (265 words): This band has changed up their lineup tons of times but now that they’ve gotten rid of their (ill-advised, IMHO) saxophone player, they actually sound really good! So yeah, I hyped their new song.

Show preview column for the first week of April (2410 words): Trying to make these a bit more concise, but let’s face it, it’s eight different shows a week, the word counts are always gonna be high. This is the most writing-intensive thing I do for the site, and while in hypothetical situations my bosses/coworkers always say that since I’m the one on staff who can really write, I should be doing stuff like this, in practice they always bug out that it takes me three or four hours to crank this column out. Which is amusing to me because I think anyone who actually writes for a living will tell you that three to four hours to write 2500 words is actually a really fast turnaround time. Oh well.

Mirror Kisses video/writeup (430 words): This is a post about a new video by a local electronic musician. His stuff is pretty good, and the video is quite intriguing. I think maybe I enjoyed the video more than the song, truthfully, but I tried to be nice about both.

Preview for a signing a couple weeks ago by local comic book artist Chris Visions (552 words): (Note to self for future reference: I should really do this tumblr rundown more often so I’m not showing you guys a bunch of previews for events that have since happened) We’ve put Chris Visions in our print mag before and he’s got a pretty high-visibility comic out now on BOOM! so I wanted to hype his hometown-kid-makes-good signing at my favorite local comic store (the one where I have my subscription box—I’m going over there later today, in fact). I haven’t bought Dead Letters yet, but I’m gonna.

First Friday gallery rundown post for April: These are long posts, but other than a 150-or-so word intro paragraph and the occasional rewording of a blurb or informational statement, I mostly don’t write anything for them. I find artist’s statements or gallery preview blurbs and copy/paste them into the article. Everyone’s totally fine with that, and believe me, even hunting down all that info and copy/pasting it takes a lot of time and work. So these aren’t writing-intensive articles by any means, but I dread them every month because I know I’m looking at 4 or 5 solid hours of work. And sadly, unlike the show preview columns, they don’t get nearly as much attention as would merit the work they require to produce. Hah, maybe I should rethink this whole process…

New track by local indie band White Laces (328 words): I’m friends with 3/4 of this band (I’ve never actually met their new guitarist/keyboard player), so I admit I was partly trying to help them out with this post, but they’re also legitimately one of the best bands in the much-maligned-by-me indie genre that our city has to offer, so I’d be a real jerk not to push their soon-to-be-released second record. They’re on tour with The War On Drugs right now, so I’m hoping they’ll find a bigger label for their new record and you’ll all be reading about them on Pitchfork by Christmas. You should really click through and listen to this song, it’s great.

A ticket giveaway for Band Of Skulls (272 words): Who? I dunno, a British band. The songs I listened to on youtube were pretty good… anyway, this ticket giveaway’s over, so don’t get stoked or anything.

A review of the new EP by local postpunk/goth band Dead Fame (836 words): I’m not entirely on board with the structure of this record—why release a 12 inch with four new songs on side one and three remixes of one of those four songs on side 2? I did like one of the remixes but I think I might have liked it better if they’d just used it in lieu of the original mix on side one. The other two were not really to my liking (one, by Jamie Stewart of Xiu Xiu, felt like a troll of the entire remix concept, which is so in character for him). But ANYWAY, the four songs on side one range from pretty good to flat-out awesome, and I support what these guys are doing, so I gave them a good review. One in which you can tell I found the remixes largely superfluous and would have preferred a few more original songs, but still, a good review. And you can stream the EP as you read, too, and decide whether or not you agree with my assessment in real time!

Show preview column for the second week in April (2409 words): In which I got to hype the local show by my UK punk heroes, Good Throb—and the show drew a good crowd, at 5 PM on a Monday afternoon in a record store, no less! So hopefully I helped a little bit with that.

An article about how the local soul/funk DJ night, Soulpower, is moving operations to a new club, The Broadberry, that just opened up around here (450 words): What it says on the tin, I suppose. This is one of those fun cases where I created real-live interview quotes out of tossed-off phrases typed in a press release email. The Soulpower dudes were fine with that, though. Quoting people in a positive article is pretty much always appreciated, at least on the level I function at.

Another Dave Brockie memorial-related post (311 words): I don’t know whether I’m a bad person because I’m milking this story for all the hits I can get from it or because I’m sick of milking this story for all the hits I can get from it.

A Raleigh NC label (Negative Fun) is including two Richmond bands (Positive No and Hot Dolphin) in their 2014 Singles Club (556 words): These two bands are both excellent—one is female-fronted melodic alt-rock gorgeousness from the former singer of Dahlia Seed (that matters a lot to me and probably very few other people), and the other is garage punk with a female singer who has at least as much fuck-shit-up energy as Jemina Pearl in the Be Your Own Pet days. So yeah, I’m way into both bands and it’s just cool when some label from another city decides to feature not one but two Richmond bands in the space of three months. Smart, too, because the music scene here is one of the best in the country. Yeah, I said it.

Record Store Day preview article (929 words): A preview of what the 6 different local record stores participating in RSD had in store for today. I gave a special spotlight to the Breadwinner reissue because we always try to throw shine Pen Rollings’s way whenever possible (if there were a Richmond music Hall Of Fame, he’d be in on the first ballot). Then I tried to find a way to stretch out the article to include individual blurbs for all 6 stores, even though some of them aren’t doing anything fancier than opening the doors and trying to move some product. Nothing wrong with that, of course.

A review of Raven Mack’s newest poetry collection (707 words): I admit I have never been the biggest fan of poetry, but Raven’s done so much quality work over the 15+ years I’ve been reading his stuff that I’ll pretty much read anything he puts out. Plus, he’s been doing these local haiku tournaments once a month, and that’s a highly unusual and interesting activity to be presenting amongst the sea of bands playing and art openings that I usually cover. So I read his new book—which, unsurprisingly, I really liked—wrote a review of it, and threw in a blurb at the end for his next haiku tournament, which happens on Wednesday if any of you RVA folks are reading this and might be interested. I think I’m gonna be there, if I don’t just pass out after work.

Three giveaway posts I wrote all in a row: Carolina Chocolate Drops (416 words), Wolfmother (345 words), and Trapitol Hill (351 words): All of these had a hook-worthy angle to use, but damn if bashing out three straight posts written to a formula all in a row over the course of about four hours isn’t soul-deadening as all hell sometimes.

This week’s show preview column (2592 words): Oh look, previews that are still relevant! At least for a couple more days. The singer for the featured band (that’s her pic at the top) offered me a spot on the list for tonight, but when I wrote back to say I’d be glad to come, she never wrote back to confirm. So whether I HAVE a spot on the list for tonight is an open question. I can afford the admission price if not, though. The question right now is—will I still be awake and up for leaving the house at 9 PM tonight? Guess we’ll see…

A preview for The Broadberry’s two grand opening shows (491 words): What’s interesting about this club is that two of the guys running it also run a different club that’s about 10 blocks away from it on the same street. One of their two grand-opening shows is tonight, and it’s competing with what looks like a better show happening at their other club (see previous show preview article). So… is this a situation that will be ironed out over time? Or have they just not thought this whole thing through that well? Either way, the two shows they put on for their grand opening this weekend were such obvious local-centric bills that it makes me wonder what they’ll do for an encore. This is another wait-and-see situation happening around town.

Local rock station books actual good bands for chili cookoff this year (835 words): I wrote an article about how the local rock station booked some actual good bands for their annual chili cookoff this year (The Hold Steady, A Day To Remember, Panic At The Disco), then got made fun of in the comments by people who thought “the only relevant band on the bill is The Orwells”. Who? I swear to god I pay attention to what’s happening in the world of music. I SWEAR.

Lickinghole Creek Craft Brewery had a party for Earth Day with some sort of new beer (333 words): Why am I writing this article? I’m straight edge! Oh yeah, because no one else can. It was pretty fun typing “Lickinghole Creek” that many times [Butthead laugh], but I was still bullshitting like crazy when I wrote that stuff about the new beer they were introducing.

New song by local instrumental metallers Comrades, new LP out soon (539 words): I was glad to have an opportunity to write about this band—they’re pretty under the radar locally, because they mostly play house shows here in Richmond, but they tour constantly and are making a name for themselves in what I suppose is most accurately termed the underground metalcore scene around the US. Their new LP is out in a couple weeks, and I have a copy—it’s excellent, and will probably take them to the next level in their scene (whatever that looks like—I should be much more well-versed on what’s going on in the modern world of DIY metalcore than I actually am). Anyway, this article is one of the ones that make me happy to get to write. There are too few of those.

AND FINALLY, my full MACRoCk review, on which I was assisted by one of my interns (I wrote 3636 words, Emilie wrote another 482. Jesus): I probably should have split this into two separate 2000 word “day one” and “day two” articles—if nothing else, I could have milked it for more content. Oh well. At any rate, here it is—my weekend at MACRoCk and what I thought of the 15 or so bands I saw (and what Emilie thought of the 3 bands she saw and I didn’t).

And that’s everything since April 1 or so. If you read this far, thanks for giving a shit, I appreciate you.

April 19, 2014
"From an editor’s point of view, they are probably super fucking busy and stressed. And when you’ve written something that isn’t structurally sound or appropriate, well, that’s when the edits get rough or extreme because they’re crunched for time, and have a lot on their plate and have to start rearranging a piece and massaging it into like, the structural demands of proper criticism/journalism, so clarity takes precedence over your turn of phrase and style."

no trivia: On Feeling Weird With How One’s Work Is Edited (And How to Not Be a Big Fucking Baby About It) 

Speaking from the other side of this particular transaction, let me just add a big fat YUP to this. Brandon’s perception here is 100% accurate. And I try like hell to preserve as much of my writers’ turn of phrase and style as I possibly can. It’s the hardest part of my job, I literally get headaches from it sometimes. But “rearranging a piece and massaging it into the structural demands of proper criticism/journalism” is a big part of my job when I’m editing other writers’ work, and sometimes it’s for a piece that needs to get online NOW NOW NOW, and sometimes a writer’s vision gets sacrificed to those demands.

Click through and read the whole thing, it’s very on-point.

P.S. This additional excerpt is also very sadly accurate:

But to put a little bit of an onus on the editors here: You gotta do all of this because a lot of editors don’t really edit these days so much as they minimally change your shit after you hand it in. There’s not as much time being spent showing writers how they fucked up (because no one has the time) or where they went wrong (or even, what they did well!) and so it just becomes a stupid loop of decent writing being handed in to overworked editors forever and ever fixing the same problems for the same writers day in and day out.

April 19, 2014

zerofade94:

FREE AWESOME RAPS!

AMAZING MUSIC VIDEO!

April 18, 2014
america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

(via thoughtsaddup)

April 18, 2014
‘Prayer Of Death - Parts 1 and 2’ by Charley PattonTFW you’re at home alone on a Friday night playing old blues songs about death really loud to drown out the R&B cover band playing at the bar across the street.

‘Prayer Of Death - Parts 1 and 2’ by Charley Patton
TFW you’re at home alone on a Friday night playing old blues songs about death really loud to drown out the R&B cover band playing at the bar across the street.

11:27pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z-FUay1DSzsnV
  
Filed under: thisismyjam 
April 18, 2014

This body modification looks like a nightmare I had once.

That sentence probably tells you all you need to know about whether or not you want to click that link. But I had to make note of it.

April 18, 2014

aintgotnoladytronblues:

omikse:

livefromthetabernacle:

ゆきこさん - ミドリ

omikse this looks like ur kinda thing

wow, fukk u breh….

;_;

*still saves*

ahahahaha oh look it’s midori skronking up in a cutey honey trib. you think hearing it’s wild, you should see it. these cats are legends - their kiss-off in 2010 was a sad day for all us lovers of joyful noise. thankfully, mariko’s still kicking around - she dropped an opening theme on the flowers of evil adaptation, in full bargain-bin-jun-togawa mode - and for carrying forward some of that familiarly snarling, crusty rock with a smelly stink and a gleeful smile, everyone knows how i feel about the friday by now, surely.

Holy fuck, this is incredible.

(Source: boyatmospheric)

April 18, 2014
"Open the pages of any horror fanzine—Outre, Fangoria, Cinefantastique—and you will find listings for mail-order video companies that cater to afficionados of what Jeffrey Sconce has called “para-cinema” and trash aesthetics. Not only do these mail order companies represent one of the fastest-growing segments of the video market, but their catalogs challenge many of our continuing assumptions about the binary opposition of prestige cinema (European art and avant-garde/experimental films) and popular culture. Certainly they highlight an aspect of art cinema generally overlooked or repressed in cultural analysis; namely, the degree to which high culture trades on the same images, tropes, and themes that characterize low culture.

In the world of Horror and cult film fanzines and mail-order catalogs, what Carol J. Clover calls “the high-end” of the horror genre mingles indiscriminately with the “low-end.” Even more interesting, European art films that have little to do with horror… are listed alongside movies that Video Vamp labels “Eurocine-trash.” European art films are not easily located under separate catalog subheads or listings. Many catalogs simply list films alphabetically, making no attempt to differentiate among genres or subgenres… Where art films are bracketed off, they are often described in terms that most film historians would take pains to avoid. Instead of presenting Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Salo (1975) as a work that explicitly links “fascism and sadism, sexual licence [sic] and oppression,” as the Encyclopedia of European Cinema does, Mondo simply notes that the film “left audiences gagging.”

The operative criterion here is affect: the ability of a film to thrill, frighten, gross out, arouse, or otherwise directly engage the spectator’s body. And it is this emphasis on affect that characterizes paracinema as a low cinematic culture. Paracinema catalogs are dominated by what Clover terms “body genre” films, films that Linda Williams notes, “privilege the sensational.” Most of these titles are horror, porn, exploitation, horrific sci-fi, or thrillers; other non-body genre films—art films, Nixon’s infamous Checkers speech, sword-and-sandal epics, and so forth—tend to be collapsed into categories dictated by the body genres that are the main focus…The design of the catalogs… enforces a valorization of low genres and low genre categories.

Williams identifies three pertinent features shared by body genres (which she defines as porn, horror, and melodrama). “First there is the spectacle of the body caught in the grips of intense sensation or emotion.”; the spectacle or orgasm in porn, of terror and violence in horror, of weeping in melodrama. Second, there is the related focus on ecstasy “a direct or indirect sexual excitement and rapture,” which borders on what the Greeks termed insanity or bewilderment. Visually this is signaled in films through what Williams called the “involuntary convulsion or spasm—of the body “beside itself” in the grips of sexual pleasure, fear and terror, and overpowering sadness”. Aurally, ecstasy is marked by the inarticulate cry—of pleasure in porn, of terror in horror, and of grief or anguish in melodrama.

Finally, body genres directly address the spectator’s body. This last feature, Williams argues, most noticeably characterizes body genres as degraded cultural forms: “What seems to bracket these particular genres from others is an apparent lack of proper aesthetic distance, a sense of overinvolvement in sensation and emotion…..viewers feel too directly, too viscerally, manipulated by the text”. The body of the spectator involuntarily mimics “the emotion or sensation of the body onscreen”. The spectator cringes, becomes tense, screams, weeps, becomes aroused."

Joan Hawkins, Cutting Edge: Art-Horror and the Horrific Avant-garde (via giallolooks)

(Source: certifiedshawty, via aintgotnoladytronblues)