July 7, 2012
isabelthespy:

sarahwrotethat:

theparisreview:

“I wish publishing was advanced enough to use colored ink … I’ll just have to save the idea until publishing grows up.”
—William Faulkner had hoped to use different colors of ink to mark the sometimes-confusing chronological shifts in The Sound and the Fury. Now his dream will come true, in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the author’s death.
(Source: The Guardian)

I think I’d still want to read it first in standard print, but I love this, and I suspect I’d read—or dissect—it in the way Alice Munro (in the intro to her Selected Stories) says she reads, starting in the middle and reading around rather than straight through. It also seems made for the iPad (remember ‘hypertext novels’ in the ’90s? Maybe they didn’t need hrefs, just CSS).
It befits Faulkner and Hemingway’s rivalry that 14 Colors of Sound and the Fury is announced the same week as 37 Endings of A Farewell to Arms—the order behind what seems bewildering, the complications behind what seems lucid.

!
incidentally I learned that he wanted this before I read the book and it made me a lot more amenable to reading it because I think it shows that he wasn’t just being confusing and weird to fuck with you, like, he ultimately did want people to understand the story he was telling even as he knew the best way he could think to tell it would inevitably be confusing.

I read this book in high school and was completely baffled by it, to the point that I have kind of hated on it whenever I’ve discussed it since. Honestly, though, the idea of this new printing interests me enough that I am now actively excited to read it again with colored ink. I think this might actually be my way into what Faulkner was doing in The Sound And The Fury. Considering how much I enjoyed reading an annotated version of Ulysses recently, I am very aware of how much can be added to a text by just a little bit of explication along the way.

isabelthespy:

sarahwrotethat:

theparisreview:

“I wish publishing was advanced enough to use colored ink … I’ll just have to save the idea until publishing grows up.”

—William Faulkner had hoped to use different colors of ink to mark the sometimes-confusing chronological shifts in The Sound and the Fury. Now his dream will come true, in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the author’s death.

(Source: The Guardian)

I think I’d still want to read it first in standard print, but I love this, and I suspect I’d read—or dissect—it in the way Alice Munro (in the intro to her Selected Stories) says she reads, starting in the middle and reading around rather than straight through. It also seems made for the iPad (remember ‘hypertext novels’ in the ’90s? Maybe they didn’t need hrefs, just CSS).

It befits Faulkner and Hemingway’s rivalry that 14 Colors of Sound and the Fury is announced the same week as 37 Endings of A Farewell to Arms—the order behind what seems bewildering, the complications behind what seems lucid.

!

incidentally I learned that he wanted this before I read the book and it made me a lot more amenable to reading it because I think it shows that he wasn’t just being confusing and weird to fuck with you, like, he ultimately did want people to understand the story he was telling even as he knew the best way he could think to tell it would inevitably be confusing.

I read this book in high school and was completely baffled by it, to the point that I have kind of hated on it whenever I’ve discussed it since. Honestly, though, the idea of this new printing interests me enough that I am now actively excited to read it again with colored ink. I think this might actually be my way into what Faulkner was doing in The Sound And The Fury. Considering how much I enjoyed reading an annotated version of Ulysses recently, I am very aware of how much can be added to a text by just a little bit of explication along the way.

  1. 2diewouldbeanawfullybigadventure reblogged this from theparisreview
  2. hannahnah921 reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    I love this.
  3. ilikereadingshortstories reblogged this from theparisreview
  4. termina reblogged this from south-gothic
  5. petitamant reblogged this from gosharptoshutter
  6. gosharptoshutter reblogged this from andmodern
  7. andmodern reblogged this from mysilverspring11
  8. mysilverspring11 reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    Want.
  9. albertfishsticks reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    This is still the most amazing thing.
  10. accurately-depictedjesus reblogged this from theparisreview
  11. bloodybooks reblogged this from brain-braid
  12. brain-braid reblogged this from outrageouslyoutstanding
  13. outrageouslyoutstanding reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    I wish I read this publication
  14. thelovehurricane reblogged this from theparisreview and added:
    OH SHIT
  15. captainriddler reblogged this from trash-god
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  25. sunnysdeliveryservice reblogged this from katharinehempburn and added:
    maybe that would make the book readable…
  26. dreamingeternally reblogged this from andersonsfirstname
  27. thegirlwhocriedjanelle reblogged this from dederants and added:
    :’) bless.
  28. nbooey reblogged this from twiggado
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